Posts Tagged ‘NHERI’

Article: Homeschooled Less Likely to Continue Volunteering?

What are home-educated children like when they get older? How about at 13 to 17 years of age, or when 18 to 23 years old? That is a very broad question. Narrowing it down, professors Hill and den Dulk wondered, Do young people continue to be engaged in volunteering at different rates depending on their educational setting background?[1] They examined this topic, persisting in volunteering, as one way to hypothesize about civic engagement.

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Article: Better Sleep with Homeschooling

Fascinating things are often associated with homeschooling. Dr. Lisa Meltzer does research on sleep in children with chronic illnesses, the impact of deficient sleep on adolescents with asthma, and developing objective and subjective measures of pediatric sleep and she just finished a study involving homeschoolers.

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Article: Are Homeschoolers More or Less Violent?

Occasionally a news outlet makes it a point to associate a teen’s schooling type with his evil behavior. My experience is that you will (almost?) never see a headline that reads “Public-school teen shoots a peer” or “Public-school teen rapes neighbor girl.” Several days ago, however, the world was faced with “New Mexico homeschooled teen … accused of murdering family.”[note 1]

If you read the Internet for news, it seems that so many tragic stories are right in front of your face and on your mind. It appears evil is ubiquitous and you must worry all the time. And if you are part of a minority group – for example, homeschooling – then you might feel extra-sensitive or defensive about your group.

A news story like the one out of New Mexico begs the question, Are homeschoolers more or less violent than others?

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Article: Propaganda Has Been Effective

It seems it is dreadfully difficult for most Americans to remember, understand, and apply the history of the past 300 or so years. After 30 years of the modern homeschool movement, always-present private institutional schools, and the largely home-based education children experienced in what is now the United States from 1700 to 1900, the cry for the “common experience of public school” – and against homeschooling – still rattles around the country, on blogs, and in academic journal articles.

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Article: Is Your Child Coal or a Soul?

How should one refer to children? As “resources”? Or as “humans,” who are distinct from both diamonds and siamangs?

In one of my recent articles,[1] I referred to a piece by academics Acker, Gray, Jalali, and Pascal in which they acted as if U.S. case law were God.[2] Another issue arises in their article that is commonly found in writings, both academic and lay. The basic thesis is that children and young adults, pre-school through college, are resources to be measured, analyzed, tended, and managed by the government and State-run school systems.

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